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Happy 4th of July! July 4, 2008

Posted by Raul in personal life, random thoughts.
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The 4th of July marks the Independence Day for the United States of America. Although, technically, America is the full continent, I have found that US citizens call themselves Americans (which, they are) and America becomes by default only the US. For the longest time, this was a pet peeve of mine, and I would say “a friend of mine who is a USA citizen”. However, rarely would anybody understand what I meant. But if I said “my friend is American” and I was referring to a USA citizen, then EVERYBODY would understand it. So I’ve stopped nit-picking… ๐Ÿ˜€

I have had the privilege of meeting many Americans in my life, and some of them actually are close friends of mine. I have many dual-citizen friends, including Canada/US and Mexico/US. Many of my research colleagues are based in the USA, and I’ve visited quite often and have had wonderful times there (my favorite cities: Washington DC, New York, Boston).

To my American friends who are now residents of Canada, hope you enjoy the celebrations, wherever you are! ๐Ÿ™‚ I am not going to get into anything political, but I will definitely say, thank you United States of America, for producing some very fine young men and women who are near and dear to my heart, and Happy Fourth of July!

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Comments»

1. Mel - July 4, 2008

I try to be sensitive about the “American” thing when I’m in other American countries. When I’m in Canada and people ask me where I’m from, I either say “Chicago” or “The States.” And I remember that when I went with my youth group to Mexico in high school, our translators taught us how to say we’re from Chicago, or the United States – not from “America,” even though the word is easier for us to remember.

Anyway…interesting to read someone’s thoughts on the subject who has a different perspective than I do. Anyway…happy 4th/belated Canada Day.

2. riza - July 4, 2008

I always say “I’m from the States” to avoid any confusions that may abound, though I’ve been living here for five years now and rarely am asked what my country of origin is

3. Jodi - July 4, 2008

I do the same thing, I say I’m from the States. And then someone will, inevitably, say “Oh really? All of them at once? That’s amazing!” And then I get annoyed because I am trying to be sensitive and they aren’t giving me props. And I punch them in the face. I think that’s fair.

๐Ÿ™‚

4. Susannah - July 4, 2008

Riza:

“I always say โ€œIโ€™m from the Statesโ€ to avoid any confusions …”

What States? United States of America? Or Estados Unidos Mexicanos? (That’s “Mexican United States”, in English. And they’re also American, North American, to boot.)

Confusion runs rampant, when it comes to nomenclature. Better stick to city or individual state names.

If you can; I can’t even do that; where do I come from? My place of birth? The country my place of birth has now become? The country I grew up in? Where I spent most of my adult life? Or what feels like “home” to me?

Anyhow, Happy Independence Day, gringos!


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